Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Inaugural Session

HRL 2014 will start with an Inaugural Session in the afternoon of May 12 which will be be held in the prestigious lecture hall (Alte Aula). During the session, three distinguished speakers, one from each participating country, will give a plenary talk about the current state-of-the-art of this rapidly evolving scientific domain of walking robots and humanoid robotics. Afterward there will be a welcome reception at the Bel Etage of the University of Heidelberg. This event aims to offer the broad public a direct access to this interdisciplinary and rather complex scientific domain.

Short bio

Yoshihiko NAKAMURA is Professor at Department of Mechano-Informatics, University of Tokyo. He received Doctor of Engineering Degree from Kyoto University. Humanoid robotics, cognitive robotics, neuro musculoskeletal human modeling, biomedical systems, and their computational algorithms are his current fields of research. He is Fellow of JSME, Fellow of RSJ, Fellow of IEEE, and Fellow of WAAS. Dr. Nakamura serves as President of IFToMM (2012-2015). Dr. Nakamura is Foreign Member of Academy of Engineering Science of Serbia, and TUM Distinguished Affiliated Professor of Technische Universität München.

Abstract

When we talk about humanoid robots, we talk about human. This talk starts from why the field of humanoid robots is bounded by human properties and discusses a pathway to the society with humanoid robots. Information technology will allow machines to access to human models based on the data base. Humanoid technology is enhanced by the human models including biomechanics, ergonomics, anatomy, physiology, psychology, behaviors, and communication. This talk also introduces the study of neuro-biomechanical model of human at University of Tokyo for the predictive medicine from the super computing technology.


Short bio

Abderrahmane KHEDDAR received the BSCS degree (french qualification: ingénieur) from the Institut National d'Informatique (INI), Algiers, the MSc and PhD degrees in robotics, both from the University of Pierre and Marie Curie, Paris 6. He is presently Directeur de Recherche at CNRS and the Director of the CNRS-AIST Joint Robotic Laboratory (JRL), UMI3218/CRT, Tsukuba, Japan. He is also leading the Interactive Digital Humans (IDH) team at CNRS-UM2 LIRMM at Montpellier, France. His research interests include haptics, humanoids and recently thought-based control using brain machine interfaces. He is a founding member of the IEEE/RAS chapter on haptics (acting also as a senior advisor), the co-chair and co-founding member of the IEEE/RAS Technical committee on model-based optimization. He is presently Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics, and associate editor of the MIT Press PRESENCE journal, and the Journal of Intelligent and Robotic Systems, and Frontiers in Bionics; he is a founding member of the IEEE Transactions on Haptics and served in its editorial board during three years (2007-2010).

Abstract

In this talk, I will address three main directions where advanced haptic interaction is used in humanoid robotics. First, we address fundamentals and realizations of our research endeavor in multi-contact planning and control and show how complex non-gaited motion can be planned under the assumption of a known perfect model or in egocentric point cloud perception. I will describe several ways that are investigated to solve the multi-contact trajectory generation (model-based whole-body off-line optimization or QP-based closed-loop). This is exemplified with some showcases from the DARPA challenge. The second part of the paper investigates "comanoids": a humanoid that is capable of haptic joint actions with a human partner. We specifically demonstrate some concepts of equal responsibility sharing through role switching and programming of proactive behavior that are exemplified through human-humanoid joint beam transportation task. We demonstrate the importance of haptic sensing and present our approach in dealing with this issue. The final part of the talk addresses the futuristic problem of mind-controlled humanoid embodiment for self-manipulation. The underlying background of the talk is haptic contacts, and means in exploiting it as a fundamental source in planning, joint actions, and embodiment.


Short bio

Tamim ASFOUR is Professor at the Institute for Anthropomatics and Robotics at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). He is Chair of Humanoid Robotics Systems and Head of the High Performance Humanoid Technologies Lab (H2T). His major current research interest is high performance 24/7 humanoid robotics. Specifically, his research topics include humanoid mechano-informatics and design, grasping and dexterous manipulation, goal-directed imitation learning, active vision and active touch, modeling and analysis of human motion, software and hardware architectures and system integration.

He is principle investigator in several national projects: Humanoid Robots (SFB 588), Autonomous Learning, Invasive Computing) and Integrated European Cognitive Systems projects: PACO-PLUS, Xperience, GRASP, WALK-MAN and KoroiBot. He is Associate Editor of Transactions on Robotics. He is European Chair of the IEEE RAS Technical Committee on Humanoid Robots, member the Executive Board of the German Association of Robotics (DGR) and member of the Board of Directors of euRobotics AISBL. He serves on the organizing and program committees of several international conferences on robotics, including Humanoids, ICRA, IROS, RSS, RO-MAN and CogSys.

Abstract

Ambitious goals have been set for humanoid robots: They are expected to be companions and assistants for people in different ages and environments, helpers in man-made and natural disasters, winners against the world soccer champion in 2050. In this talk I will first address recent progress towards building integrated 24/7 humanoid robots able to perform complex grasping and manipulation tasks in daily environments, to autonomously acquire object knowledge through active visual and haptic exploration and to learn actions from human observation and to imitate actions in a goal-directed manner.

In the second part of the talk I will discuss the transformative impact of humanoid robotic on other research areas and application fields, where humanoid robots become 24/7 wearable companions for augmentation or replacing of human performance in daily and working environments, where wearable humanoid technologies contribute to a personalized rehabilitation in medicine or support and protect humans in human-made and natural disasters.


Last modified by: Henning Koch on 2017-03-31
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